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Archive for the ‘geography’

May01

rosi, where are my results?

Hey, I was wondering if someone can help me find out how to petition to request an approval into a program (Geography Specialist), with out using just Rosi and Subject post request.

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Yo.

I’m not sure which Geography Specialist you’re interested in (which, by the way, was a grand experience for me because I had no idea that there were so many types of Geography!), but for the most part, they’re all Type 2 Subject POSts, meaning you just need a specific GPA and x grades in y courses for entry.

So I don’t see why you would be petitioning… did you miss a requirement or something? Because if this is a matter of them just taking a while, rest assured that Subject POSt invites aren’t released until July 2 this year, so you’re just pending.

Meaning don’t freak out until then.

There’s no need for a petition, unless you’re not telling me some important little tidbits.

Cheers!

aska

Jan22

always consider the calendar!

I’m a first-year student at UTSG with my course load aimed towards an economics major and a human geography major. I have a 4.0 FCE but I’m struggling in ECO100Y making my cursor float over the “drop course” button on rosi numerous times. If I drop it, will it have an effect on my transcript/CGPA? And can I retake that course next year without any worries? I also have MAT133Y and I don’t know what other majors/minors require it.

Also, If I decide to go with a major in human geography (total of 7.0 FCE), and minors in GIS (4.0 FCE) & Asian Geographies (4.0 FCE), what options do I have for the remaining 5.0 FCE to graduate? Can I just take random courses and accumulate FCEs that way? Or do I have to choose another path?

Thanks,
angelo

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Yo yo!

If you drop ECO100Y1 right now, then no, it won’t affect your transcript or CGPA. This year, you have until February 18 to drop any Y courses without any academic penality or whatnot. And if you want to take it again next year (or maybe this summer), that’s totally fine, as long as you haven’t been assigned any grade — meaning you dropped it this year before February 18.

As for having MAT133Y… um, yay? Are you asking me what programs use it as an entry requirement? Well, I’d assume anything remotely mathish or sciencey, so take a look at the calendar dude!

There you can also take a look at some courses that might interest you for that remaining 5.0 — possibly even more since your geography requirements might even overlap. Basically, with those you can take whatever you want. Just make sure you prioritize all your program requirements and breadth requirement.

Cheers!

aska

Dec02

When Politics and Speaking German Are Not Your Thing Try Saving The Planet

Hi Aska,

So I have a couple of questions for you…

I’m currently a first year student at UTSG. Originally, I came into U of T with the intention of majoring in political science and/or German, so all
of my courses now are in the humanities/arts field. However after a few months, I realize that I’m more interested in Geography/Environmental
Studies, which was something I considered seriously in high school. So I am concerned because I’m not sure if I would need to transfer into the Life Sciences Department. What’s the deal with this?

I also just realized that in order for me to major in this, I would need to have taken Chemistry 12 in high school in order to take the first year
Biology and Chemistry courses, and I failed my Chem 12 AP course….Does this mean I can’t take the Chemistry and Biology first year courses? Who can I talk to about this?

I have one last question regarding degree requirements. I read somewhere that only 6.0 FCES from 1st year courses are counted towards your degree. Considering how I will probably have 5.5 FCES already from 1st year courses in the HUMANITIES/ARTS field, how will this fare for me since I will be taking biology/chemistry/math first year courses next year for my new intended major?

Sorry for the rant….

MajorChange

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Hey Major Change,

Political Science … phew who needs that when we have people like Rob Ford in control. He seems to have things under control <insert obvious eye roll here>

This switch shouldn’t be all that horrifying. Life Science is apart of the Arts and Science department so switching around is mainly just having the requirements and applying to the subject POSt.

Saying that, I don’t actually think Life Sci is the best place to share your enviro/geography love.

They do have a couple of programs but the Centre for Environment or Geography department might be suiting.

Unfortunately most of the science streams in both Environment and Geography do require Grade 12 Chem and Bio. Meaning that you would have to look into doing some highschool nightschool or an equivalent to take even the first year courses. I have heard that sooooome math courses don’t check the highschool requirment, but I haven’t heard anything about chem or bio. You can call the departments and see if they will make an exception but I wouldn’t rely on that.

But in the spirit of Christmas/Hanukkah/Kwanzaa and any others that I have forgotten, I have an alternate solution for you. Well actually a couple of possible solutions (I know, I can feel your excitment radiating through the screen).

1) Take a stream of Env or Geo that’s an Arts program over a science. These bad boys do not have highschool science requirements.
2) There is a specialist and major program called “Environmental Geography” which just might combine all your interests.
Any first year coures that exceed the 6.0 credits are considered “extra credits”. Meaning that the marks are not calculated into your CGPA and do not count towards your graduation requirement of 20 credits. BUT they can count towards your programs requirements.
Rants are always more intersting then calm speaking.
snuggles and warm apple cider,
aska
Apr14

we are the world

Hey aska, I’m considering enrolling in the GGR216 intensive course which is supposed to be offered during the summer semester from mid-May to early-June. How many assignments should I expect to complete? Has UofT offered these before? Also, what’s the job market like in early June after the course is over? Will I be crushed in my quest for knowledge? Help!

Dan

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Hey Dan! The Geography Man!

The summer intensive courses are indeed new this year. They seem…intense. Since your class which normally would be four months is condensed into three weeks (!), you will have class from Monday to Thursday from 10-12, with a much higher reading schedule and workload. I assume that the general workload might be the same as a half credit (usually that’s two tests and an essay, or two essays and two tests…), but I’m not sure exactly what the deal is going to be, timing-wise. The best person to talk to about this would be the Geography Program.

In terms of the job market after June and life after graduation, that is anyone’s guess. It probably depends on what you want to do Dan, and how you want to go about pursuing it. If that means more school, or graduate studies, you will need to get references from your professors and try your hand at some research projects or academic publishing. If you want to work in a more practical field, you should apply for a fall internship when you are done school.

I think generally it is hard to get a job after graduation, but not for those who are dedicated to their field and are willing to work for free or volunteer in order to get there. If you are passionately engaged in an experience doing something you love, the job will come. Know what I mean, Dan?

xoxo, Askastudent

Jun08

Aunt Eye Cal End Hair.

I am having the hard time in choosing the courses. I’d like to know the course load of the following courses:
RLG100Y1Y
GGR124

Thanks.

 

Another school year has passed us by, and another round of course enrollment looms in the not-so-distant future. With a new cohort of students entering of U of T, I am morally obliged to advertise the “Anti-Calendar.” Proudly presented by the Arts & Science Students Union (ASSU), this document presents a synthesis of course evaluations that students fill out at the end of term. While the info may not always be transferrable to subsequent courses (e.g. there’s a new Prof), the Anti-Calendar is still one of the most useful resources for course selection, and/or mindless time consumption. Aska shamelessly refers to it like a broken record.

 

The 2008-9 version will be available in mid-June online and in tangible form at the ASSU office.

In the meantime, I will rely on the 2007-8 edition in the hopes that you readers will chip in … a lot.

 

Before I begin let me just say… If you are a new student, which it sounds like you are, then I wouldn’t base my course selection solely on work load. Sure some course combinations yield a hellish course load, but very few are heaven-ish. And even if you could take the Sun & its Neighbours’ 5 times simultaneously, where would that leave you?

 

May I suggest considering…

a) pre-requisites for subject POSts that you might want in the future;

b) distribution requirements;

c) courses of pure interest (I’m convinced everyone likes at least one thing); and

d) first-year seminars.

 

According to the Anti-Calendar, from 2 years ago, RLG100 was interesting and not too tough (woo), but the tutorials are supposedly not great (boo). One Prof seems enthusiastic and fun, and the other seems enthusiastic and approachable. Students indicated that the workload was about 4.25 out of 7. So, like, average.

 

The Anti-Calendar indicated that GGR124 had a marginally lower workload. The Profs were reported to be… guess what?… enthusiastic. Apparently the powerpoints aren’t posted online, which is totally irritating. I guess you’ll HAVE to go to class.

 

A second useful resource, when selecting courses, is the exams and course collections database (search by department… it’s easier). PDFs of many past exams and syllabi are accessible here. Calm down, most Profs are not lazy enough to repeat the same exam two years in a row, BUT reading previous exams gives you a great idea of the course content. And yes, I said the word “syllabi.” Plural for syllabus, it is a pretentious word for course “outline” (oh, how banal!). Get used to it. Again there are no guarantees that these details (e.g. description, lecture topics, modes of examination) will remain the same from year-to-year, but they will probably be really similar.

 

On a side note, syllabi are like “contracts” between the student and Prof. So, if the Prof ever changes assignment weightings or late penalties without consulting the class you totally have a leg to stand on when appealing to them.

 

And that’s all I have to say about those two courses that I have never taken. Any help from out there?!?

 

P.s. Both courses had non-multiple choice exams. So, you’re on the right track so far.

Jan16

We All Aren’t Equal, After All…

i was wondering if uoft takes into consideration what school u did ur undergrad
at? for example, my friend did hers at university of ontario (uoit) and has a
very high gpa, while i’m here busting my ass for the minimum. more
specifically, she’s applying to uoft’s masters program for crim.

(more…)

Jun28

law and order

Hey Askastudent!!! i love this site, its totally hilarious and informative at
the same time =)

I was just wondering what you’ve heard of the law program at UofT. How hard is
it to get in? I am considering completing a specialist in criminology, then
doing a masters in crim, then law school… i hope!

My gpa in first year was 3.6. I haven’t been volunteering, nor have I joined
any extra curricular clubs in my first year.

In your opinion, would joining a club or two and volunteering help in spice up
my application for a masters program/law school?

thanks a million (more…)

Jun13

a smooth criminal

how do i complete a master’s in criminology?

by dusting for prints in each of your ex-boyfriends bedrooms and solving the case of the frat house that roofied your best friend’s roomate. oh wait. that was an episode of veronica mars last week. (more…)

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