non degree

strong mathematical background lol

Hi,

I have a four year undergraduate degree in Economics and Finance from the Lahore School of Economics, Pakistan. I have developed an interest in quantitative/mathematical finance and would like to pursue a masters program from either the UofT or any other university.

The masters program in the aforementioned fields expects applicants to have a very strong mathematical background. Unfortunately, my degree, although somewhat quantitative in nature, isn’t too quantitative and I won’t be eligible to apply for the masters program right now. Therefore, I was wondering if there is a possibility to take the following undergraduate courses in math at UofT as a *non degree applicant* and get credit for the courses so that I can apply both at UofT and other places.

1. Multivariable Calculus (MAT237) (also Calculus 1 and 2 if need be)
2. Ordinary Differential Equations
3. Partial Differential Equations
4. Linear Algebra I and II
5. Algebra I and II
6. Real Analysis
7. Probability and Statistics I and II
8. Computer Programming (R or Python or C++)

I am looking for answers to the following questions:
1. Is it possible to take the aforementioned undergraduate courses in math at UofT as a non degree applicant and get credit for the courses?
2. Is there a specific person/department at UofT whom I should directly reach out to? There isn’t much information related to non-degree students on the website so I would want to talk to someone to know more.
3. Where can I find course level fee information? For example, what would it cost to take a course in Ordinary Differential Equations.

4. Is there a webpage/link that explains the process to apply as a non degree student to undergraduate courses?

——————————————

hey friendo,

undergrad in econ and finance. that’s cool, you’re more accomplished than i am.

first thought in my mind was that that’s an awful lot of courses to be taking as a non-degree. i feel like you should get in touch with the admissions office(s) offering the program you’re interested in, and just make sure that none of the credits you already have will work in place of these requirements. there’s a possibility they may be able to make exceptions, as well– i can’t guarantee it, but it might be worth looking into before you drop a hefty sum of money on these classes.

anyway, because i’m a chronic overachiever, here’s the most thorough rundown you’re probably gonna get of each course you asked about.

1. multivariable calculus: MAT237Y1

you were correct that this will require as prerequisites calculus 1 (MAT135) AND calculus 2 (MAT136), which are both half-year courses. in lieu of those two, you can take MAT137 which seems to be pretty much equivalent and is a full-year course. there are a few other alternatives, as well as grade thresholds to meet, which you can look into here. 
2. ordinary differential equations (MAT244)

this is just the intro course, and if you get the prereqs that i listed above for multivariable calculus you should have what you need to take this course, too. the advanced course is MAT267, if you find you need it too. 

3. partial differential equations (MAT351 or APM346)

to take MAT351, you’ll need an 85% in MAT237 and MAT267. APM346 might be a bit more flexible in terms of prereqs– you’ll be able to get in with just MAT237, it seems, which you’ll be taking anyway. the two courses are basically equivalent, and i’m not aware of any major differences.

4. linear algebra i (MAT223) and ii (MAT224)

all you need is high school-level calculus to get into MAT223, and once you’ve got MAT223 solidly under your belt, MAT224 should let ya in no problem.

5. algebra i (MAT240) and ii (MAT247)

high school calc will get ya in to MAT240, which in turn will make you eligible to take MAT247.

6. real analysis (MAT337)

you have a lot of options in terms of prereqs for this one– i’d suggest taking a look at yourself. slashes are like ‘or,’ and commas stand in for ‘and.’ in short, you’ll need as prereqs at least 3 different classes, which i think will be met if you take some of the other classes you say you need.

7. probability and statistics I (STA257) and II (STA261)

if you take MAT135 and 136 and get at least a 70% in both, or take MAT137 in general, you’ll have prereqs for STA257. STA 257 should serve as a prereq for STA261.

8. computer programming (R or Python or C++)

i think CSC108 may be what you’re looking for?

as for your other questions:

is it possible to take the aforementioned undergraduate courses in math at u of t as a non degree applicant and get credit for the courses?

i believe so. i’d contact the relevant departments– math, statistics, and compsci— just to confirm. as a non-degree student, you’d have a later enrolment date than degree students as most of these courses prioritize students working towards a program.

is there a specific person/department at u of t whom i should directly reach out to? there isn’t much information related to non-degree students on the website so i would want to talk to someone to know more.

you can reach out to enrolment services, or perhaps the woodsworth college registrar? to my knowledge, non-degree students are typically issued to woodsworth, so if any registrar would be useful to talk to my guess would be them.

sorry, i dunno why this gif is so threatening.

where can i find course level fee information? for example, what would it cost to take a course in ordinary differential equations.

this link will give you a rundown of your fees– above 3.5 FCEs in the fall/winter session, you’ll be paying program fees. below that, you’ll pay per course. just click on the ‘non-degree’ option on the first page and the document should redirect you to the relevant fees. i’m making the assumption that you’re an international student– if you’re not, this document should help you out.

4. Is there a webpage/link that explains the process to apply as a non degree student to undergraduate courses?

you can check out this link— just ctrl f non degree– or have a look at woodsworth college’s guide to being a non-degree student.  the woodsworth one provides what is probably the most detailed info on non-degree students that i’ve found at u of t, and i would definitely, definitely encourage you to have a look at it.

hope all of this helped! i’m tired now, and it’s snowing, and all i want to do is take a nap. closing this post off with this rad but super unrelated gif i found while browsing for other ones to spice up this post. it’s so fluid. look at him goooo

be Boundless,

aska

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