• prereqs

    very vague and mysterious of you

    I’m currently in high school and I’m planning on taking a course in the summer to meet the requirements of my condition. Has anyone done this before and can you share what the process was like?

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    hi there!

    i’m not really sure what you mean by the requirements of your condition… do you mean your conditional acceptance?

    without more information, i’m not sure that i can answer this in a helpful way. i do know that people take summer courses to meet course prerequisites — one common summer course to take is calculus. if you’re worried about meeting math prereqs, you can look into the PUMP program, which is a u of t-run course that addresses that specific worry.

    i’ve never taken a supplementary summer course myself, so unfortunately i can’t tell you what it’s like!

    but i would recommend reaching out to your registrar’s office to ask about the process, and clarify what hoops you might need to jump through (submitting transcripts etc). even if you haven’t started your first year yet, you can book appointments with an academic advisor if you’ve been admitted to the school.

    sorry i couldn’t be more helpful, and best of luck with this!

    be Boundless,

    aska

  • academic offense

    off the hook!

    Hi, I was accused of academic offense last month for plagiarism in a final test worth of 25%. I shared my account with my friend and they copied some of my answers. My instructor reached me and I gave him all the evidence I have. Fortunately, I was forgiven and he won’t forward my case to the dean said in an email. The problem is, I am planning on a trip and I may not respond to email for weeks. I wonder if my matter will be dropped for good or if there will be further investigations.

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    hello there,

    i hope you haven’t left for your trip yet! sorry it took me a good minute to get back to you on this. for more urgent inquiries, i always recommend that you contact the appropriate u of t office, like your registrar.

    if your instructor has told you that your case won’t be forwarded to the dean, you can rest assured that your matter will be dropped unless you’re notified otherwise. according to our darling academic offence bible, the code of behaviour on academic matters, no further action is taken when an instructor doesn’t notify the dean or department chair of an offence. here’s the specific wording, so you can see it for yourself:

    “If after such discussion, the instructor is satisfied that no academic offence has been committed, he or she shall so inform the student and no further action shall be taken in the matter by the instructor, unless fresh evidence comes to the attention of the instructor, in which case he or she may again proceed in accordance with subsection 2.”

    i hope this helps you feel better, and that you have a safe trip! if there’s anything else related to this that you’d like professional advice on, please don’t hesitate to contact your registrar to book an appointment with an academic advisor. as far as i know, nothing you tell an academic advisor can be used against you when a matter of academic offence goes to trial.

    be Boundless,

    aska

  • academic offense

    it’s academic offence season again

    Hi there. I would like to ask what kind of academic offense will be taken to tribunal directly? Is copying significant part of an exam possible? I am really stressful these days and I don’t know if I might get suspended.

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    hello hello,

    thanks for getting in touch, and i appreciate your patience with this answer!

    as far as i know, no academic offences are taken directly to the tribunal. the code of behaviour on academic matters is your friend when navigating these situations, but it can also be a little hard to understand.

    to my understanding, the document indicates that you’ll meet with your instructor to discuss a potential academic offence first. after that, you’ll have another meeting with the department chair or dean.

    an academic offence case only makes it to the tribunal when, after a meeting with the dean or department chair, a student does not admit to an offence and the provost lays a charge against the student.

    apart from that, i’d really recommend that you reach out to your registrar’s office and book an appointment with an academic advisor to guide you through this. academic offence cases are so very stressful to deal with, and you deserve professional support. as i understand, nothing you tell an academic advisor can be used against you in an academic offence case.

    please also remember that u of t has mental health care resources for you to access if you feel overwhelmed by this stress. the My SSP program, for example, is accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week in multiple languages.

    i hope this situation gets resolved all right, and that you look after yourself and reach out for support!

    be Boundless,

    aska

  • suspension

    sometimes i wish life had a refresh button

    Hi. I recently got suspended from university with a note in my transcript and I wonder is there a way to start over in another uni because I’m a first year. thanks

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    hey there,

    i’m sorry to hear this happened to you! thank you for your patience with this answer, and i hope you’ve been doing all right after that news.

    as far as i’m aware, you wouldn’t necessarily be able to “start over” at another university — i believe you’re obligated to submit your entire academic record to any university you apply to. while i’m not sure what the specific circumstances of your suspension are, i’d imagine that being suspended at u of t might make it difficult for you to be admitted to another university.

    but this is one of those times i have to give a huge disclaimer that i’m just a student, and don’t know everything about how universities work. i think your best bet for good advice in this situation is to get in touch with your registrar’s office and ask to book an appointment with an academic advisor. you’re in a difficult situation, and you deserve to navigate it with professional advice. an academic advisor will also have access to your whole academic record, and may know better what options you have for moving forward.

    sorry i couldn’t be more helpful! but i hope you figure this out, i’m cheering for you.

    be Boundless,

    aska

  • colleges

    bye woody!

    hi!! i’m an incoming student! i was accepted to woodsworth but after doing more research i kind of wanna switch to vic 🙁 do you think it’s possible? thanks!!

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    hello there,

    welcome in advance to u of t, and congratulations on accepting your offer of admission!

    it is indeed possible to switch colleges. you can find information on switching into victoria college on this webpage. the process essentially involves sending a very detailed email to the victoria college registrar. the contents of your email, as well as your CGPA, will determine whether or not your transfer is successful.

    unfortunately, the deadline for the 2021-22 academic year has already elapsed, but if you’d like to switch colleges at the end of your first year, that’s apparently the time that transfer requests are most likely to be approved. i’ve actually never heard of anyone switching colleges between admission and first year. so give woodsworth a try for your first year — if it helps, i’ve heard that it’s much easier to get financial aid/bursaries there than most other colleges!

    hope this clarifies things, and good luck with first year.

    be Boundless,

    aska

  • internal transfer

    jumping ship before you even step aboard

    Hi! if i have gotten accepted to UTSC for Fall 2021 (im in highschool) and I want to go to UTSG (I didn’t apply there), when and how can I transfer. Thanks

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    Hi! i Just got accepted into Life sci at UTSC for fall 2021 and when i applied i had a living arrangement which i sadly dont have anymore. I was wondering how hard it would be to transfer to the st george or even mississauga campus before i start in the fall. Thanks!

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    hello there,

    answering these two questions in one go because they’re pretty similar!

    to transfer between campuses, you’d need to apply for an internal transfer. essentially, that would entail going through a sort of admissions process again, in order to transfer to another branch of u of t. i’ve never heard of an internal transfer being done before first year, though. as far as i know, internal transfer applications are only open in the fall/winter. so the earliest you’d be able to attempt a transfer to another campus would be during the upcoming academic year.

    if you do decide to do an internal transfer, you’ll need to go through the OUAC process again. you know the one.

    yes, again.

    keep in mind that your CGPA and most recent annual GPA will be used to make the admissions decision. according to this webpage, you generally need a B average to be a competitive applicant.

    anyway, i’d strongly recommend that both of you reach out to your registrar’s office and book an appointment with an academic advisor to discuss this. they might know other avenues you can take, and will generally be more familiar with the internal transfer process given that i’ve never undergone it. you deserve to navigate this with assistance!

    (and also, a side note: to the one of you who lost your housing plans, check out this old guide i did on finding housing as a student!)

    be Boundless,

    aska

  • admissions

    i’m getting so old

    Hey there! Will I have to state which program(s) I’m interested in when applying to the social science admission category, or any others for that matter? Thanks a lot 🙂

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    hi!

    i’m working from my memory here, but when i applied to u of t, i did have to include one program of interest in my application.

    there’s one big thing to note about that, though: you won’t be held to whatever program you choose, so try not to overthink it.

    first of all, the program you choose won’t be realistic anyway. unless you plan to pursue a specialist, you’ll need to complete more than one program to earn your degree. when i applied, you could only select one program and i selected a minor. i could never have graduated with that selection.

    also, even after you’re admitted to u of t, you’ll still need to go through the subject POSt selection process after second year to actually become a student in your desired program(s). you can read more about that process here.

    why does the application process bother asking if all this is the case? i’m not sure. i selected a program affiliated with the college i applied for, in hopes that it would make me a better candidate for that college. i don’t know if that’s how things actually work, but if you want to try that strategy, you’re welcome to.

    i hope this clarifies things! again, i’m working from a memory that’s a few years old now, so if you know anyone who has applied to u of t more recently it may be worth checking the details over with them as well.

    be Boundless,

    aska

  • courses,  prereqs,  subject POST

    it can indeed be done

    Hey Aska! I’m a grade 12 student. I’m going to UofT next year in the Life Science admission category. The truth of the matter is, I am very interested in two very different programs (life sci and poli sci). My understanding is that you can double major in programs from two different admission categories, even though you’re only allowed one admission category. Is that right? Also, do different majors have prereqs? And if they do, do you think it will be possible to fit them all in my schedule?

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    hey there,

    congrats on accepting your offer of admission! it’s great to hear that you’re interested in different programs — i honestly think the people who study super different things, like chemistry and history, are the coolest people on campus.

    your understanding is correct — it’s totally okay to double major in programs from two different admission categories. different majors do have different prerequisites, though. you can find out what those prerequisites are by consulting the appropriate program entries in the arts and science calendar. in nearly all cases, it is possible to fit those prerequisites in your schedule with a little careful planning. degree explorer is your friend here.

    in first year, your admission category will afford you priority enrolment for certain courses — since you’re in lifesci, that means it’ll be easier to get into things like BIO120. but i wouldn’t say this will necessarily stop you from registering in humanities or social sciences prerequisites. plenty of people do it, and if you encounter difficulties, you can also reach out to your registrar’s office for help. in fact, if you want to have a chat with an academic advisor before your course enrolment begins, you should be able to book those kinds of appointments over the summer.

    hope this helped, and a very early welcome to u of t!

    be Boundless,

    aska

     

  • ASIP

    an old school trying new things

    Do you happen to know any information about the new ASIP program? I’m in an eligible program for it but I don’t quite understand how it’ll work 🙁 If you could help me out I’d really appreciate it!

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    hey there,

    this large, large school is always coming up with new things for me to catch up on, huh? which is really a good thing, because hopefully it means things are improving.

    i don’t know a ton about ASIP, because it’s launching in the fall of this year. it sounds a lot like the co-op programs that other schools, like the university of british columbia, run. if it’s anything like those programs, it’ll entail applying to jobs and then participating in a paid work opportunity. these types of things are really great for getting substantial stuff on your resume before you graduate, and my friends who have participated in co-op programs have enjoyed them. but ASIP is new, so it’s entirely uncharted and i can’t say how similar it’ll be to co-op.

    to confirm details and find out more, i’d suggest that you attend one of these information sessions. but if it helps at all, it does sound like a cool opportunity that i’d be interested in if i were eligible. unfortunately, i’m too old.

    hope this helped!

    be Boundless,

    aska

     

  • academic offense

    a little good news for you!

    hi there. Last few days had been particularly stressful to me. My instructor in a math class had contacted me and claimed I might committed plagiarism with other students. I have shown him evidence and he seemed to believe me. Later he said he won’t be forwarding my case to the dean. I wonder if the dean would still investigate my case and might use the evidence against me. Thanks.

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    hi there!

    to my understanding, if your instructor says that he isn’t forwarding your case to the dean, i don’t believe the dean will be investigating you. according to the code of behaviour on academic matters, when an instructor decides that a student has not committed an academic offence, no further action is taken. i doubt that your dean would have time to investigate a case that wasn’t forwarded to them, even if they wanted to: the varsity has reported that there’s a bit of a backlog in academic misconduct cases, because the number of those increased so much recently.

    in the future, if you find yourself in this situation again i’d suggest you contact your registrar’s office and ask to speak to an academic advisor. academic misconduct cases can be incredibly stressful, and you deserve to navigate those with support. i believe that nothing you tell an academic advisor can be used against you when your case is investigated.

    overall, this sounds like a rough situation to be in. i hope you take some time to look after yourself, and i hope that this answer helps.

    be Boundless,

    aska

  • odds are that won't be asked again

    no one gets rest here. this school lacks a BEd

    Hi there! Do you happen to know any information on education, specifically teaching internationally? I’m currently going into second year, so I only just enrolled in a double major for English and BMS, but now I’m wondering if I need to pursue an education degree to teach internationally. I’m aware that U of T doesn’t really have an “Education major,” just the education and society minor. How exactly would I become qualified to teach internationally then? Maybe I don’t need an education degree in my undergrad? Maybe I need to go to grad school for it instead? I’m very confused, and I’ve tried to do a ton of research online and in reddit but I decided to reach out to you because I was still confused 🙁 I hope you can help! Thanks so much 🙂

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    hey,

    unfortunately i don’t feel all that qualified to answer this! i did a bit of research, but like you mentioned, it is a bit difficult to figure out. i was only to find stuff on websites that i don’t recognize, and that kind of info can be a bit hard to trust sometimes.

    this webpage indicates that qualifications will vary depending on where and what you want to teach, which makes sense. it seems like the standard is to have a bachelor’s of education degree, though. if you’re looking for that at u of t, your confusion is understandable.

    as far as i know, you are correct that the education and society minor is pretty much it for u of t education programs at the undergrad level. i believe other schools, like the university of alberta and the university of british columbia, offer bachelor’s of education programs. u of t does not. if you’d like a bachelor’s of education, you may need to transfer to another school. if you’re interested in doing a graduate degree in education at u of t, you may want to look into OISE’s master of education program.

    i’m not sure what type of international teaching you’re hoping to do, but if you were hoping to teach english classes abroad, you might want to look into getting a “teaching english as a foreign language” certificate.

    apart from that — sorry, bud. i don’t really know.

    in terms of how to move forward, you can try reaching out to your registrar’s office. i’m not sure if the academic advisors will necessarily be specialists on how to become an internationally accredited educator, but they may know the right directions to point you in for more information.

    i wish i could be more helpful! best of luck.

    be Boundless,

    aska

  • courses

    as you can tell i am very type a

    Hi! Do you have any tips on how to manage or organize our required courses? I’m gonna be an English major and Book and Media studies major, and they both have a lot of requirements that I’m not sure how to space them out. Do you think I should be doing some second year courses in third year and stuff (so like, for example doing 2 200-level English courses in 3rd year to free up some space for my requirements for BMS and maybe even a breadth requirement) thank you!!

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    hey there,

    this is a good question! thanks so much for your patience with my answer.

    it’s absolutely fine to do some second year courses in third year, and even fourth year. conversely, it’s okay to take 300- and 400- level courses in second and third year as long as you’re up to the challenge and can meet all the prerequisites. i know plenty of people who arrange their schedules that way, because program requirements can be a bit tough to coordinate.

    in terms of other tips i have to manage and organize required courses:

    • degree explorer is your friend! it won’t be quite as helpful for scheduling courses, but it is great for keeping track of which requirements you’ve fulfilled and which ones you still need.
    • on top of using degree explorer, i like to use colour-coded spreadsheets as well. at the end of my first year, i created a lil 40-cell spreadsheet matrix with one cell per half credit of my degree. then, i colour-coded: i assigned pink to program 1, yellow to program 2, and blue to program 3, and used those colours to fill as many cells as half-credits i’d need for each program. then i went in and used text to fill out the course codes of specific required courses, and bolded the ones i still needed to take. that helped me keep much better track of what i was juggling. i’d show you my lil colour-coded matrix, but it would be blatantly clear what my POSts are, and i value my anonymity.

    • when planning out courses in a more long-term way (ie. beyond one semester) see if you can figure out which program requirements will cause you the most distress (lol) and try to space them out well. sometimes, you’ll need to talk to upper-years in your program to see which classes are well known to be difficult.  sometimes you can just assess this based on your own strengths.

    that’s about all the tips i have — but if you’d like to talk this over further with someone, i’d suggest reaching out to your friendly local registrar’s office. if you’ve never spoken to someone at your registrar before, here’s a guide i wrote that will give you the basics — this is from pre-covid, though, so obviously in-person services won’t be open.

    i hope you have a good summer, and best of luck planning your courses!

    be Boundless,

    aska

  • admissions

    the ol switcheroo

    Hi! So I’m not entirely sure if I want to apply to social sciences or life sciences next year. I’m leaning more towards social sciences though. Question is, if I get accepted into social sci and end up deciding I want to go into life sci can I make that switch? And if I decide to stick it out until the end of first year in social sci and decide that it’s not for me will I be able to easily change programs? Or will other students get priority? Thank you!

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    hey there,

    it’s very normal to be uncertain about what you want to apply to!

    if you get accepted into social sciences and end up deciding you want to go into life sciences, you can certainly make that switch. the nice thing about u of t is that you don’t need to put another application in to switch faculties, the way you might need to at another school where there are separate faculties for arts and science.

    really what you’re applying to when you apply to ‘social sciences’ is an admissions category. i believe it may give you priority enrollment for social sciences courses, but it’s not a program per se — programs are your majors, minors, and specialists, which you’ll apply to after first year.

    so it should be quite straightforward to switch between admissions categories, at least within the faculty of arts and sciences. if you decide to switch relatively early on, for example before you register in your first year courses, then you could just avoid selecting prerequisite courses intended for social science students (like SOC100, for example). instead, you could select prerequisite courses for the life science programs you’re interested in. to find those prerequisites, consult the artsci calendar. 

    if you want to keep your options open, you can try registering in prerequisites for both social science and life science programs in first year. then, you’d be able to apply to any of those programs during the program selection period that begins near the end of the academic year. for more information on applying to programs, you can check out this webpage. 

    if you commit to social sciences in first year and then decide closer to the end of the year that you want to switch, that’s a bit more complicated. you’ll need to pick placeholder programs in order to be eligible for second year registration, and in your second year, you’ll need to take those life science prerequisites. then, at the end of your second year, you can apply to life sciences programs. you might be wondering if entering your programs so late might be considered abnormal, but it’s actually quite common — lots of people decide to switch!

    i hope this helped, and feel free to send me another question if any of this isn’t clear. i realize the system can be quite confusing!

    @ U of T,

    be Boundless,

    aska