askastudent

your student life specialists

Jan 18

final destination

For undergrad, can someone do two years at York then transfer to UofT for the last two years? Is this difficult to do? Honestly thinking of doing this as I really want to go to UofT but I’m an international student and cannot afford 40k tuition each year for four years.

———————————————

hey,

it is definitely possible to transfer to U of T from york but it’s a whole process. not a terrible process, but a process nonetheless.

first, you need to be in pretty good academic standing, and by pretty good, i mean a solid B average. if the program you are trying to enter is more competitive, you might need to contact the department for a more accurate average.

second, you can’t apply if you are more than 2 years into a degree, meaning if you were to transfer into the same program after 3 years of york, you wouldn’t be able to, you’d have to apply for a different program.

third, you have to meet all the high school entry requirements as well as university requirements for your program.

the application process will be through OUAC105 since you won’t be applying as a high school student, and after you are admitted, you will need to have your transfer credits assessed by U of T. the university can grant you a maximum of 5 transfer credits (1 full year).

the whole transfer process is outlined nicely at this link, so take a look!

basically, it’s not that difficult if you meet all the requirements and are in good academic standing. however, all things considered, transferring to another university is a huge change and you might want to think about whether or not you want to leave your already established group of friends and community.

hope you make the right decision!

peace and love,

aska


Jan 17

summer course overload

Hi Aska,

Just wondering, if you plan to enrol in 2.0 FCE in the Summer are you able to take an online course as well?

Thank you for your help!

———————————————

hey buddy,

if you enrol in 2.0 FCE’s and want to enrol in one extra online course, it would be considered a course overload. to get approved for a course overload, you’ll have to set up a meeting with your registrar. during your meeting, they will look at your past grades and have a conversation with you about whether or not a course overload is practical. generally, you’re more likely to be granted an overload if you are in good academic standing and have been able to handle full course loads in the past.

you’ll see here that the maximum course load for summer is 2.0 FCE’s.

so yes, you are allowed, but it’s up to your registrar!

peace and love,

aska


Jan 16

summer, night school, same diff

So I am currently a grade 12 student and am planning on applying to UTM for Life science. Please give me a good grasp on this, because I’ve been hearing inconsistent feedbacks from different people, but what is an average that most life science admitted students get around? I have people telling me it is super competitive where you must have high 80s at least, but I also have family friends on their 4th year saying as long as your average is above 80 and around low to mid 80s, there is nothing to worry about? So what do you think it is?

Also, how focused are they on individual marks instead of averages? because my other courses are in low to high 80s but my advanced functions is stuck in the 70s. So I was wondering if you could give me info on that too.

Last question, is there any discrimination against courses taken in summer or night school?

Thank you

———————————————

hi!

the life science average is available right here and it states that you’ll need low to mid 80’s.  when information is spread from person to person, it can become quite skewed, so it’s always a good idea to go right to the source! keep in mind that admission averages change from year to year and some years can be more competitive than others.

my understanding is that individual marks aren’t as important as your average, but if you are applying to Life Science and happen to have a high average because of A’s in humanities classes, yet you got a C in Biology, they might see that low biology mark as a red flag. enrolment services will definitely take into account classes that you took which are relevant to the program.

 

and finally, according to the UTM admissions FAQ: “All courses are considered equivalent, whether it is day school, night school, summer school, private school or online, as long as it is completed through a Ministry of Education recognized institution and it is your first attempt at that course.”

sound like you’re good!

peace and love,

aska


Jan 16

don’t forget to drop your courses when you move

Hey I failed grade 12 calculus, chemistry, physics, and biology. All uni level. This was because I only attended the first week and then moved kinda far away, but I FORGOT to drop the courses! I retook them all achieving high marks:

SBI4U – 84% (failed first time)

MHF4U – 85% (passed first time)

SPH4U – 99% (failed first time)

SCH4U – 98% (failed first time)

MCV4U – 99% (failed first time)

ENG4U – 73% (this one sucks, passed first time)

GPA: 89.6%

My question is, do the courses that I failed, due to the reason stated above (moved away), count towards my GPA? Or do the higher, newer marks count towards my GPA? I was wondering because uoft doesn’t use repeated marks, so do my new ones count as repeated, or not? What is the procedure if you failed a course and then retook it? Which number do they use for GPA admission?

And will my average be high enough to have a good chance at being accepted for mechanical engineering, physics, computer science, and engineering science? I haven’t decided which one yet lol.

Thanks so much!!

———————————————

sup,

this is quite the predicament that you’re in! can’t say i’ve ever heard of anyone else doing this.

arts and science has a blurb in their policy which states the following:

“The Faculty of Arts & Science does not recommend that students repeat courses and reserves the right to give preference for admission and scholarship consideration to students whose marks are the result of a single attempt at each course. Students with extenuating circumstances requiring them to repeat such courses should send an explanation to Enrolment Services at the time of application, i.e. prior to the admission decision.”

long story short, you might be able to attach some sort of an explanation to your transcript. it does say in the FAQ for engineering admissions at UTSG that it is their policy to only count the first attempt, but it also says that you can provide documentation to explain any extenuating circumstances.

perhaps something along the lines of:

“i moved and foolishly forgot to drop my courses lul so i failed but it’s k cuz i did them for real and i got good grades, see?”

since you haven’t indicated which campus you’re planning on attending, i’m going to assume you’re referring to UTSG, since UTSC and UTM don’t offer engineering courses. here are the averages that you would need to get into engineering (below), and physics, and computer science at UTSG.

Low 90’s Engineering Science
High 80’s Chemical, Computer, Electrical, and General First Year
Mid 80’s Civil, Industrial,  Materials, Mechanical and Mineral

 

 

hope this helped,

good luck with your application!

peace and love,

aska


Jan 16

with a grain of salt

hi.

i am a sixth-year student, hoping to finally begin grad school next year
(fall 2017). i have heard that grad schools assign more weight to
undergraduates’ later academic performance than their earlier; however, i
was wondering if this is supposed to indicate that higher-level courses are
more heavily weighted, or if it is rather simply because they are looking
for how well the student is doing closer to the time of the application.
so, for example, say you left a bunch of required courses to the end of
your degree, and they are 100- and 200-level courses, and you do
significantly worse in them than you did in 300- and 400-level courses that
you took much earlier –– would the lower-level required courses be
overlooked in favour of high marks in the upper-year programs? or is it
really that it is about whatever courses were most recently taken, and so
the lower-level courses would be given greater weight.

thanks,
‘non

———————————————

hey,

this is a really good question. each school is different in their process of assessing your transcript. to get more program-specific information, i would highly recommend that you contact the school yourself and take what i am saying with a grain of salt.

sorry. i had to.

however, typically, they DO look at your last two years to get an accurate idea of your most recent academic standing. with this in mind, they will still have access to your whole transcript, meaning that if there are certain courses that you took earlier on that were more relevant to the program you are pursuing, they won’t necessarily be ignored.

so, no. higher level courses (300-level or 400-level) courses aren’t weighted differently.

capisce?

peace and love,

aska

 


Jan 16

s’okay

Sup Y’all, I enrolled into a minor program (EAS) in order to get priority enrolment for a first year language course. Now that I’m two months into the course, is it safe to drop the minor program and still retain my spot in the course?

———————————————

hello,

**fyi there is one aska at the moment so as much as i wish we could be considered a “y’all”, “we” is only me 🙁

after taking a look at all the first year language courses available for EAS, it seems like none of them require you to be in an EAS subject POst to stay in the course, so i would say that it’s safe to drop to retain your spot in the course.

keep in mind, you’re only allowed to change and delete your subject POsts during specific periods. these vary depending on which type of subject POst you’re adding or deleting, but you can check all of that at this link, right here and right here.

hope this helped!

peace and love,

aska

 


Jan 12

wait til you get here

hello hello first off!! you’re an angel for doing all of this like ?? i am saved from so much anxiety and pls save me from another attack plsplspls
SO, since i was just so busy and occupied from september to mid november, i just finished up the ouac 105d application this week and i’m expecting the university of toronto to come back with my jointid thing in one or two weeks. but i keep obsessing over how it says, on the page where they apply, that spaces fill quickly and that you should apply “well in advance”. i’m thinking i’ll get my full application in by december 15, about a month before applications are due. is that too late?

i understand that you have no idea just how many students are applying this year, of course, and since the university participates in university fair at the beginning of november, i’m hoping that indicates that they aren’t totally abhorred by the idea of december applications… but i still do feel very concerned. is it a lost cause?

———————————————

why hello again,

gurl, pls. breathe. inhale. exhale.

first, i want to acknowledge that i am fully aware that the application deadline is indeed tomorrow and that i didn’t get to this question in time. i’m sorry about that, but you’ll find that my answer wouldn’t have helped you out too much.

while askastudent may claim to be all-knowing, unfortunately, there are certain limitations to our knowledge.

the enrolment services people are hella mysterious. no one really knows what goes on in those offices, not even my omniscient self! what is written on the site is basically all the info they were comfortable with releasing and we kind of have to roll with it.

it is true that some programs will fill up, but some programs are definitely more competitive than others.

to me, applying a month in advance sounds like it would be fine, but in the end, it really comes down to how strong your application is. taking the time to send in a good application is definitely better than applying super early with a mediocre application.

stay calm, youngling. everything is going to be okay.

i totally understand your pre U of T anxiety, but just try to enjoy the last couple of months of high school before you’re thrown into the pre-real world. what’s done is done!

that being said, i hope you get in.

peace, love, and chill pills,

aska


Jan 11

but i thought being outstanding was a good thing

I’ll (hopefully) be graduating this coming summer.

I was wondering though what will happen if I cannot pay off my current
tuition by the end of winter term? Will they prevent me from graduating,
attending the ceremony, getting my degree, etc?

Thanks as always.

———————————————

hello!

first of all, i love the “hopefully” graduating part. people keep asking me if i’m graduating this year and i’m always like:

anyways, this is a great question! thanks for asking it!

disclaimer: the following information is only valid for students in the faculty of arts and science.

there are definitely some real consequences of not paying off your fees. keep in mind, these fees fall under a category of other “university obligations” which you will also need to fulfill. (e.g. library fines, incidental fees; for a full list, consult this link)

you won’t be able to receive your diploma or any proof of completion of a degree, but you will be able to attend the ceremony. wooo!

some other notable consequences of not paying off your fees are that you won’t be able to order official transcripts or register as a continuing or returning student. it would be best to quickly double check with your college registrar’s office to see if you have anything else that’s outstanding just in case you’ve missed something!

unfortunately, at U of T, being “outstanding” in the context of fees is a bad thing. bummer.

all of this information is actually explained quite nicely in the link above, so i would recommend that you take a thorough look at that! hope this helped!

peace and love,

aska

 

 


Jan 11

don’t lose hope, youngling

Hello,

I am a life science student in the second year. After completing the fall term studying, I feel that it is very difficult to get a high GPA. I wonder if I get 3.0 cumulative GPA after graduation, what can I do? what school accept me? what work opportunities do I have? Thanks.

Best,

———————————————

hello,

*as askastudentuoft, i hope you understand that i am knowledgeable about all things U of T, and that’s about it, so this post will be very U of T centric*

while a 3.0 GPA is great, many of the life science graduate programs available at U of T require averages which range from B+ to A- (with the exception of the occupational science and occupational therapy program which looks for mid B’s). but, keep in mind, these are just life science programs available at U of T. there are plenty of other schools which offer similar programs which may require different averages.

you’re only in second year, which means you don’t ACTUALLY know if you’re going to end up with a 3.0 average. you seem to have already lost hope in yourself. don’t stress out right now about what your work opportunities will be and just try your best to get the best grades you can. i can’t really tell you what kind of work opportunities will be available when you graduate because we don’t even know what program you’ll be pursuing for grad school!

a good place to start is the career learning network. it’s a great tool for current students and recent graduates. you can use it to find research positions (i hear the life science people like those) and postings by companies looking for recent U of T graduates. logging onto the career learning network website is definitely the first step you should take when looking for work opportunities for students like you!

for now, focus on school and building up your resume with work and volunteer experiences. they can be relevant or irrelevant to your field, but having experience is definitely an asset when applying for any kind of job. volunteer at a hospital from time to time or make some money tutoring kids grade 10 science! whatever it is, just make sure you work hard and build up a good collection of references in case you need them for grad school.

in all seriousness, i’m graduating later this year and i don’t even know what work opportunities will be available to me! i can’t even see into my own future, let alone yours!

anyways, hope this was somewhat helpful!

good luck, work hard, and try your best at everything you do.

peace and love,

aska


Jan 10

ENG 4UofT

hi! regarding the political science question, is there a specific grade needed in ENG 4U that is needed? i read that for st george, you needed low 80s in ENG 4U. I meet the general admissions marks but my English grade is quite a bit lower than my other 5 subjects.

———————————————

hey there,

like i said in the previous post you’re referring to, at st. george, polisci falls under the social science category, so according to the requirements for ontario high school students, you’ll need an overall average (taken from ENG 4U and your next 5 best U/M courses) that’s in the low to mid 80’s. however, it does also state that you should have at least mid to low 70’s as your ENG 4U grade.

in terms of a specific grade needed, the best we can do is provide you with this “mid to low 70’s range”. my understanding is that it would be hard for the university to provide specific grades since not all students are admitted solely based on their academic performance.

hope this answers your question!

peace and love,

aska

 


Jan 06

hydration and team-building

what exactly is frosh week? is it all drinking, partying etc haha

Jan 06

honk

Hi

Do you think it is easier to form a community and actually have a group of freinds much easier at Mississuaga than t St. George?

While transferring from St George to Mississauga, if I have five credits, will all my five credits be transferred?

Thank you very much.

———————————————

hi,

wow, another subjective question! i wish i could just say something along the lines of “put on a canada goose jacket, walk 20 steps northwest of convocation hall, do your best goose call and wait for your new friends to flock over” but unfortunately life does not work in such wonderful ways.

regarding friends and communities: i can’t speak for utm since i’ve spent my whole undergrad at utsg, but it really doesn’t matter which campus you’re a part of, it’s all about you. i know that seems really deep but it’s actually quite simple.

friends are easy to make if you make yourself available and keep an open mind. if you’re rude and distant to people, chances are, you won’t make very many friends. when we were younger, we were taught not to talk to strangers. i’d say now that we’re in university, talking to strangers is the only way to go about making friends. you won’t be the only one at either utm or utsg looking to make a friend. during a break in class, maybe strike up a conversation with someone who looks approachable. small talk does suck, but at least after that, you’ll know one person in your class! the easiest way to start a conversation, i find, is giving someone a compliment. i’m not saying that you should say “omg you’re so hot” to that guy who should be pursuing a modelling career instead of being in your class, but something simple like: “nice pencil case!” can be good. if they seem reluctant to continue the conversation, just move on to another person! easy as that!

profs will sometimes even force you to talk to the person seated beside you in class. this is usually just so you can have a buddy in class to catch you up if you miss a class, but that’s also a way to meet people!

aska story time: i once made a friend in class because she said “i like your superman shirt!” and then “i like your hair!” and then “i like you!” to me. it was a bit much, but we’re friends now and that’s all that matters.

if all else fails, please try the goose call method and let me know what happens.

in terms of being part of a community, we all have different definitions of communities. communities can close-knit and not so close-knit (? can’t think of a better word). joining a club or being part of a residence can automatically make you belong to a community, but it all depends on you and your willingness to participate and be involved. find a club from the ulife list of something you’re interested in. attend a meeting or an event. if you like it, continue showing up and see what happens! the more involved you are, the more close you’ll be with others in a community!

if you’re transferring from UTSG’s faculty of arts and science to UTM, according to this link all your credits will be retained unless you’re other undergraduate divisions like applied science and engineering, music, physical education and health, or architecture. if your program is outside of the faculty of arts and sciences, you will have to apply for a transfer credit assessment.

hope this helped! like i’ve said in the past, if you don’t make any friends, a crisp $20 bill will buy you 1 hour of friendship with askastudent.

honk honk,

aska

 


Dec 19

bottom of the enrolment totem pole

After having completed my BA in a humanities field at U of T I am considering switching directions and following a social sciences path. I know returning as a non-degree student is an option, but I was wondering if non-degree students have problems getting into class with enrolment restrictions or 400-level classes? Is there a way to apply for a second bachelors or something similar?

———————————————

hey!

so at U of T, we have a rule that you can’t complete a second degree in the same field as your first degree. since pursuing social sciences would give you another BA, its’s not exactly allowed. you’d have to pursue a different kind of degree, e.g. a BSc.

furthermore, it’s highly recommended that you discuss all of this with an academic advisor (registrar). you can sit down with them and have a discussion about whether or not it is practical/ necessary to pursue another degree/ more courses.

non-degree students are at the bottom of “the totem pole of priorities at U of T”, so you may end up on a waitlist/ not get into the courses you want. you’ll only be able to enrol in classes after everyone else enrols. tough, i know.

for more on how second degrees and non-degree courses work, check out this post!

i’m sorry to deliver you the cold hard truth so soon to Christmas or whichever holiday you celebrate (or not celebrate).

here’s a .gif to cheer you up.

elf buddy the elf

hope that helped. buddy the elf always makes me feel better.

stay warm,

aska


Dec 16

i hate you people (dentists)

Hi there!

I’m from Latin America and I applied to the MSc in Oral Pathology
(dentistry). My application was rejected. I thought I had a strong letter
of recommendation and a solid background (although maybe not enough
research experience), which leads me to believe my undergraduate GPA wasn’t
high enough (3.2, minimun for my country to apply was 3.0) and was the
primary reason of my rejection.

I would like to ask if any of you is currently accepted in the program,
with what GPA did you get in, and if you recommend for me to reapply.

Thank you!!

———————————————

hello,

first of all, i’m really sorry to hear that you didn’t get into the program. i’m sure you worked very hard, but don’t lose hope. there are definitely plenty of career paths you can pursue with your grades and educational background!

i’m actually not a dentistry student, but in posting this, i hope you’ll get feedback from other applicants in the comments!

i’m going to try to answer this question while ignoring the fact that dentists are the bane of my existence…

unfortunately, i can’t tell you exactly why you didn’t get in. that’s a question you’ll have to ask admissions.

however, in regards to your GPA, while it is true that a 3.0 GPA is the minimum, it seems that most applicants who were invited for interviews had higher GPAs. to quote the one of the answers given on the dentistry website:

“A minimum current grade point average of 3.0 (4.0 scale) is required to apply to the Doctor of Dental Surgery Program (DDS). However, a grade point average of 3.0 (i.e. B) at the time of application does not guarantee selection. It should be noted that the 170 domestic applicants invited for an interview had a GPA of at least 3.85 and the 10 international students invited for an interview had a GPA of at least 3.75.”

this may explain why your application got rejected, but again, we will never know for sure. if you have any further questions about admissions, you could always talk to dentistry student services, but it is highly unlikely that they will be able to speak to you about your application specifically.

it’s completely up to you if you feel like reapplying! you should really think about whether or not you want to continue pursuing dentistry. if you do feel like reapplying, maybe consider taking some non-degree courses in order to boost up your GPA for an even stronger application. i believe in you!

good luck with your future endeavours!

peace, love, and don’t forget to floss,

aska


Dec 09

always choose the option with the dog

Hello Aska!

I’m extremely frustrated and stressed at how much I’ve taken school for granted, so much that I’m now on academic probation! I’m currently taking 4 courses at UTSG and I know for sure I can not pass this one course. So I’m wondering if it’s possible to drop it before the deadline (Nov 6) without it harming my academic standing.

Please tell me something good.. otherwise I’m quitting life and taking my dog and we are moving to the mountains and becoming mountain people

———————————————

hello,

first of all, i realize this answer may no longer be relevant, but i hope in the future you’ll direct your more urgent questions to a registrar! as much as i would like to answer everyone’s questions immediately, some questions do take more time to answer and as a result, it’s hard to answer questions in a timely manner.

nevertheless, i will answer your question now so future students in your situation can benefit! dropping a course before the drop deadline will not have an effect on your academic standing. yippee! i really hope you actually dropped it.

if you ever miss the drop deadline, you have the following options, to credit/ no credit (or as some people call it, “see-ar, en-see-ar”), or to late withdraw from the course.

to credit/ no credit (abbreviated as cr/ncr) the course is an option if you are doing poorly in the course and are not sure if you will pass. if you do pass, you’ll receive credit for the course and no grade. if you don’t pass, you won’t receive the credit. keep in mind, this only applies for courses that you don’t need for your program. you can cr/ncr up to 2.0 FCE’s. cr/ ncr deadlines are usually well into the respective semester and are listed in the ‘sessional dates‘ section of the arts and science website.

to late withdraw (LWD) from a course is for situations in which you think you’ll fail and if you’ve missed the drop deadline and the cr/ncr deadline. it won’t affect your GPA and your transcript will just say LWD.  you can LWD from up to 3.0 FCE’s. you’ll have to go through a LWD with your registrar and discuss what went wrong to prevent it from happening again. the deadline for late withdrawal is on the last day of classes in each respective semester, meaning dec 7th is the last day to LWD from an F course, and april 5th is the last day to LWD from S and Y courses)

pro-tip: take a look at all the sessional dates and mark the dates for cr/ncr and LWD on your calendar. you never know when those dates will come in handy!

registrar’s offices always get students saying, “well i didn’t know when the deadline was!” well, tough.

moral of the story? keep in touch with your registrar’s office when you have an urgent situation. they’re a great help and don’t usually bite.

giphy-1

peace and love,

aska


  • Caution! student content ahead

    This site contains candid exchanges between students. Prepare yourself for vivid language and opinions.
  • Categories

  • Archives