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Archive for the ‘arts & sciences’

Mar24

programs ‘n such

Hi Aska, I am a grade 12 student who just applied for INternational
Relations at UTSG, however I was wondering if it is possible to undertake a
double degree in IR and Anthropology at U of T? If so, what would the
course load be like, similar to majoring in both subjects or harder? As
well as, how long would it take for me to complete both degrees, would it
be the standard timeframe of 4 years or longer?

Thanks

———————————————

hello,

at U of T in the faculty of arts and sciences, we have programs, which are basically your major and minors:

  1. a specialist (one discipline) e.g.  specialist in international relations
  2. a double major (two disciplines) e.g. majoring in international relations and anthropology
  3. one major and two minors (three disciplines) e.g. majoring in international relations, minoring in anthropology and … english?

if you specialize (option 1), you’ll be going more in depth with one subject, but if you pick option 2 or 3), you’ll be able to dabble in more disciplines, but at a more shallow level. does that make sense? it depends on how deep you wanna go into the subjects you are studying.

what you’re referring to is a double major in international relations and anthropology, which is definitely possible.

each option is equal in terms of difficulty and course load, meaning that you can complete any of the three options in the “standard” 4 years. some people finish their degrees under 4 years by taking courses during the summer, and others take longer to complete their degree because they take a smaller, more manageable course load throughout 5+ years. both options are pretty common!

i hope this answered your questions!

peace and love,

aska

Mar15

program fees vs. course fees

Dear aska,

I’m a fourth year student and I want to take an extra semester of courses to improve my gpa for Masters applications. I’m an Education and Society minor and I need to finish 0.5 credit internship before I can graduate. I’m planning on doing it in fall 2017, not taking winter courses and graduating in June 2018. You answered a question (entitled: i have LOTS of problems) that basically encapsulates my situation as well. But what I’d like to know is that if I am a full-time student in the fall (probably taking 3-4 courses) and I don’t take any courses in the winter term, would I still be a full-time student. And do I still have to pay full year’s tuition?

Regards,

Struggling Student

———————————————

glad to know someone’s reading our wee li’l blog!

arts and sciences will assess your status by looking at the full session (both fall and winter), meaning that if you are only enrolled in 3-4 courses in one semester, you’re still considered a part time student.

let’s assume that by taking 3-4 courses, you mean 1.5-2.0 FCE’s. according to the faculty of arts and sciences, you’re still considered part time and you’ll be able to pay per course fees. the link above explains everything in excruciating detail ^

you will also be paying reduced incidentals, which are specific to your college: <— select which college you are part of and you’ll be able to see what fees you’ll be paying.

basically, as long as your course load is 3.5 credits or lower, you’ll pay course fees.

hope this helped!

peace and love,

aska

 

 

Jan18

i will find you

Hello! I can’t seem to find the statistics on those that were accepted into the faculty of arts and science. Help would be appreciated!

———————————————

yo,

stats are hard to find. don’t feel bad. you have come to the right person.

in addition to being ridiculously charming and hot (like my homeboy liam neeson), i also possess a very particular set of super ninja detective samurai skills. fear not, for i have found what you are looking for.

there’s this super cool thing called Common University Data Ontario (CUDO) which can give you stats on:

  • Number of degrees awarded, student enrolment and entering averages – all by program;
  • Number of students living on campus and activities offered;
  • Student satisfaction;
  • First-year tuition and ancillary fees by program;
  • Number of teaching faculty;
  • Undergraduate class size, by year level;
  • Research awards granted; and
  • Graduation rates and employment rates by program.

click on the year that you want to see and voila! you can even look at stats on UTM and UTSG.

go crazy!

peace and love,

aska

Jan06

honk

Hi

Do you think it is easier to form a community and actually have a group of freinds much easier at Mississuaga than t St. George?

While transferring from St George to Mississauga, if I have five credits, will all my five credits be transferred?

Thank you very much.

———————————————

hi,

wow, another subjective question! i wish i could just say something along the lines of “put on a canada goose jacket, walk 20 steps northwest of convocation hall, do your best goose call and wait for your new friends to flock over” but unfortunately life does not work in such wonderful ways.

regarding friends and communities: i can’t speak for utm since i’ve spent my whole undergrad at utsg, but it really doesn’t matter which campus you’re a part of, it’s all about you. i know that seems really deep but it’s actually quite simple.

friends are easy to make if you make yourself available and keep an open mind. if you’re rude and distant to people, chances are, you won’t make very many friends. when we were younger, we were taught not to talk to strangers. i’d say now that we’re in university, talking to strangers is the only way to go about making friends. you won’t be the only one at either utm or utsg looking to make a friend. during a break in class, maybe strike up a conversation with someone who looks approachable. small talk does suck, but at least after that, you’ll know one person in your class! the easiest way to start a conversation, i find, is giving someone a compliment. i’m not saying that you should say “omg you’re so hot” to that guy who should be pursuing a modelling career instead of being in your class, but something simple like: “nice pencil case!” can be good. if they seem reluctant to continue the conversation, just move on to another person! easy as that!

profs will sometimes even force you to talk to the person seated beside you in class. this is usually just so you can have a buddy in class to catch you up if you miss a class, but that’s also a way to meet people!

aska story time: i once made a friend in class because she said “i like your superman shirt!” and then “i like your hair!” and then “i like you!” to me. it was a bit much, but we’re friends now and that’s all that matters.

if all else fails, please try the goose call method and let me know what happens.

in terms of being part of a community, we all have different definitions of communities. communities can close-knit and not so close-knit (? can’t think of a better word). joining a club or being part of a residence can automatically make you belong to a community, but it all depends on you and your willingness to participate and be involved. find a club from the ulife list of something you’re interested in. attend a meeting or an event. if you like it, continue showing up and see what happens! the more involved you are, the more close you’ll be with others in a community!

if you’re transferring from UTSG’s faculty of arts and science to UTM, according to this link all your credits will be retained unless you’re other undergraduate divisions like applied science and engineering, music, physical education and health, or architecture. if your program is outside of the faculty of arts and sciences, you will have to apply for a transfer credit assessment.

hope this helped! like i’ve said in the past, if you don’t make any friends, a crisp $20 bill will buy you 1 hour of friendship with askastudent.

honk honk,

aska

 

Dec19

bottom of the enrolment totem pole

After having completed my BA in a humanities field at U of T I am considering switching directions and following a social sciences path. I know returning as a non-degree student is an option, but I was wondering if non-degree students have problems getting into class with enrolment restrictions or 400-level classes? Is there a way to apply for a second bachelors or something similar?

———————————————

hey!

so at U of T, we have a rule that you can’t complete a second degree in the same field as your first degree. since pursuing social sciences would give you another BA, its’s not exactly allowed. you’d have to pursue a different kind of degree, e.g. a BSc.

furthermore, it’s highly recommended that you discuss all of this with an academic advisor (registrar). you can sit down with them and have a discussion about whether or not it is practical/ necessary to pursue another degree/ more courses.

non-degree students are at the bottom of “the totem pole of priorities at U of T”, so you may end up on a waitlist/ not get into the courses you want. you’ll only be able to enrol in classes after everyone else enrols. tough, i know.

for more on how second degrees and non-degree courses work, check out this post!

i’m sorry to deliver you the cold hard truth so soon to Christmas or whichever holiday you celebrate (or not celebrate).

here’s a .gif to cheer you up.

elf buddy the elf

hope that helped. buddy the elf always makes me feel better.

stay warm,

aska

Dec09

transferring + that calculus requirement

Hey Aska, I had a question regarding the calculus requirement for Life
Science programs. I haven’t took high school calculus, and am moving soon
and want to transfer to U of T. I am currently taking a first year math
course here at York.  The U of T website says “A suitable community college
or university course in calculus” counts,  but I’m not sure if the course
I’m taking, “Mathematics for the Life and Social Sciences” will count since
it’s not strictly calculus  (though it covers Biocalculus for at least 85%
of the course.) please let me know if I can fulfill the requirement with
the course I’m taking (and if so, what mark is satisfactory, since I don’t
think I can pull off an A atm). If I can’t fulfill the requirement I’ll
just take PUMP or night school.

Thank you Aska, I appreciate your help!!

———————————————

hello,

so U of T has a great resource called ‘transfer explorer’ where you can plunk in a course taken at another institution (in your case, york) to see what its U of T equivalent would be. when you put in  ‘MATH1505: mathematics for the life and social sciences’ in transfer explorer, it states that the equivalent (last assessed in 2014) is U of T’s JMB170.

the course description of JMB170, doesn’t give me the impression that it is a calculus course. i’m not sure what life science program you’re trying to get into, but from my point of view, MATH1505 doesn’t seem like it would carry over and be considered as a valid calculus course.

just out of curiosity, i took a quick look at the department of psychology’s calc requirement and couldn’t find anything that would include JMB170. if i’m not mistaken, calculus courses at U of T generally have MAT course codes. my recommendation for you would be to contact your chosen life science program directly.

contacting the faculty of arts and science may also be able to help you with this issue, since they are the ones who decide ultimately which courses transfer over.

if worse comes to worse, PUMP is definitely a good option. you’ve done your research!

good luck with everything and i hope you have a smooth transfer process!

peace and love,

aska

Nov20

not another college question

Hi!
I’m a student who’s applying internationally for the faculty of arts and
sciences. And I really don’t understand the college system.
I mean I do, but like, are there subjects that are not available in all
colleges? Are there any colleges that are  academically lower than others?
I’m planning to either major in film or english, is that going to matter?
Also, how do I do my research about the colleges? I’m really lost about
this whole situation.

Thank you so much, your blog really helped clear up a lot of thing.

———————————————

hello,

i was going to preface this post by saying ‘ugh, not another college question’, but you’ve asked some questions that i think are important to address, so i have no sass for you today.

let me try addressing your questions one by one.

1. are there any subjects that are not available in all colleges?

do you mean to ask if there are any subjects that are exclusive to certain colleges? the answer to that is no. you have access to all courses in the faculty of arts and science regardless of your college affiliation.

2. are there colleges that are academically lower than other colleges?

no, not that i know of. there are students who perform well and students who perform poorly at every college. even if there were, we most likely would not be able to disclose that information on aska because that would be hella shady.

3. i’m planning on majoring in film and english, does that matter?

not really. innis college IS known for their cinema studies program and there isn’t really ONE college affiliated with english. innis also has a writing and rhetoric program, while vic has literature and critical theory. the only thing that might matter is, for example: you might hear more about cinema studies events if you’re an innis college student. regardless, it shouldn’t be too much of a problem as long as you are subscribed to the right listservs (email subscriptrions). to see a list of every college’s specialty, click here!

4. how do i conduct research on the colleges?

you can go on this website and find the tag ‘colleges‘. we’ve answered tons of questions similar to yours and you’re bound to find out a lot about each of them. even browsing reddit or college websites can tell you a lot about them. maybe you’ll find that one particular college gives off a good vibe. like i’ve said in the past, what college you’re part of doesn’t REALLY matter unless you’re thinking of living in residence. there’s also college culture to consider, but you’ll have to find out about those yourself by talking to people from the respective colleges.  if you want more info on the residences offered, check out our ‘residence‘ tag!

keep in mind that when you’re ranking colleges, some colleges (innis, vic, trin) require you to rank them first.

choose wisely, my friend.

 

giphy-2

 

peace and love,

aska

Nov04

it wasn’t me (clean version)

You said the UofT English courses are very traditional, but I was wondering what exactly that entailed. I know there are probably a few hundred pretentious schmucks out there that’ll swear by their life that there’s nothing they’d enjoy more than rereading A Midsummer’s Night Dream, but that’s just not me. I have a friend in the states that’s doing a BA in English and they had courses like Zombie Literature and etc. Is there anything as fun and interesting as that at UofT?

———————————————

hey,

uhhhhh not sure who said that, but it wasn’t me! i am (believe it or not) the 15th aska running the site and i’ve actually never taken an english course at U of T. thank you, IB credit!

thank you for offending all the pretentious schmucks reading this- i’m sure they’re angrily shaking their berets at you. *lowkey high five*

k, but seriously, shakespeare can be good sometimes. (i’m saying this as someone who doesn’t read for pleasure) i’ve definitely watched some very interesting sparknotes vids on shakespearean plays… “to be, or not to be”… that’s a thing, right? i only pretend to know shakespeare because of michael fassbender and oscar isaac’s portrayals of shakespearean characters.

giphy-3

U of T is just as hip as any school in the states, okay? we’re such a huge university, it would be a shame to not have some good classes.

in our english department, you can take classes on graphic novels, children’s literature, detective novels, science fiction, and fantasy and horror. if you want to check out the full list of courses that are offered, you can find them in the calendar.

if you can’t find ‘fun and interesting’ courses in english, there’s always mus321perhaps you’ll find some more down-to-earth mustachio’d fellas. (p.s. it’s MOVEMBER now, i’m so happy)

hope these courses are fun and interesting enough for you!

cheers,

aska

Nov04

waffling is a great word

Hello

I am a little older, and thinking of returning to do further coursework and
possibly a second bachelor’s. But am waffling between nondegree and part
time.

For part time: is there a minimum course load per term? Or can you skip a
term or two?

For nondegree students: can you apply at some point to switch to degree
stream?

Thanks
———————————————

hello there!

i never knew that waffling was a word. thanks for adding that to my vocabulary!

doing further coursework?!! well, to each their own.

i’m kidding of course. there’s nothing wrong with furthering your education, i’m just jealous i don’t have that drive (or the GPA)… but that’s a story for another time

if you are thinking of pursuing a second bachelor’s degree, there are guidelines that U of T provides- found here, but honestly, it doesn’t make a lot of sense to me.

the only thing to take away from the above link is the fact that you can’t pursue the same degree, meaning if you have already received a bachelor of arts, you’d have to come back and do a different bachelors (e.g. a bachelor of science).

the process of coming back for a second degree is pretty straight-forward. you should first set up a meeting with a registrar at your college (same college you were at in your undergrad). before making any big academic decisions, i always recommend speaking with your registrar first, just so you don’t get screwed over by some random rule or exception down the road.

with the registrar, you’ll discuss if coming back for a second degree is really necessary or if there are other options that you can consider (a different career path, pursuing grad school/ a masters program). if you and your registrar come to the conclusion that indeed, coming back is a practical option, you’ll have to go through a petition process.

if your petition is approved, you’ll be granted 5 transfer credits, 4.0 at the 100-level and 1.0 at the 200-level, meaning your second degree can be completed in 3 years as opposed to 4 years.

part time students can be enrolled in anything from 0.5 FCE’s to 2.5 FCE’s per fall-winter session, meaning you could be enrolled in 0.5 credits in the fall and 0 credits in the winter, and still be considered a part time student. you can also be enrolled in 1.5 FCE’s and 1.0 FCE’s in the winter (totalling 2.5 FCE’s), and still be considered a part time student. if you are registered with osap, it might be worthwhile to double check with them what their definition of part time status is.

if you are an international student, you may run into some immigration/ visa issues, so we urge you to check with the centre for international experience before enrolling in part time studies.

non degree students are typically students who are taking courses to fulfill certain requirements (GPA cut-off, required courses) for grad school or masters programs. for example, some students may need to come back for an english requirement and therefore would enrol as a non degree student.

the question of “what’s the difference between part time and non degree” doesn’t exactly apply because you can, in fact, be a part time student AND a non degree student at the same time.

the university doesn’t give you a strict timeline in terms of how long you take to complete your courses. you can technically take as long as you want, with as many breaks in between as you want! yay!

you can definitely switch from non degree to a degree stream, but again, you’ll have to petition this process with your registrar.

hope this is enough info for the time being! if you have any follow up questions, please do not hesitate to leave a comment on this post, and i’ll do my best to answer it!

good luck!

cheers,

aska

Sep23

google is a great tool that some of us use from time to time

What month do undergraduate students go on semester break and when do they return back to university?
———————————————

hi,

kudos to you for taking the extra effort to send us a question when it probably would’ve required less effort to just google it!

the december exam period is for this year (2016-2017) is from december 9th to 20th, which means everyone will be done exams by the 20th of december and the university will be closed following these exams.

classes start up again on january 5th for arts and science students and january 9th for engineering students.

information regarding engineering and arts and science sessional dates can be found here!

for future reference: feel free to google the following words: “u of t sessional dates” to find what you’re looking for!

u of t is a great place to learn how to google things- you’ve come to the right place.

cheers and #sorrynotsorry for the saltiness,

aska

Sep20

gold or painful, agonizing failure

Hi! Can you take a psych major if you’re in humanities? Like, if I take a double major in linguistics and psychology, will I graduate with a BA or a BSc? Or is it even possible for me to major in psychology if I didn’t apply for life sciences?
I’m at St. George by the way, and I’ll have completed PUMP by the time I apply for the psych POSt.
Sorry if you already answered this, I did my best to look through all the relevant tags!

———————————————

hi there,

if you are double majoring in linguistics and psychology, you can pick whether you want a BA or a BSc.

in the arts and science calendar under program requirements, it states :

  • “A student completing one Major in a science area and one Major in an arts area have a choice of either the Honours Bachelor of Science or the Honours Bachelor of Arts.”

you’re good to go! choose wisely!

YOU DECIDE WHICH IS WHICH^

thanks for making an effort to check the tags! we appreciate it!

cheers,

aska

 

Jun02

lul bye artsci

hey aska,
I’m planning to attend utsc next year for co-op public policy. I originally chose this program because I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do but recently I decided that I actually want to study economics. is it possible to transfer into the co-op economics for management studies (BBA) program during my first year? I took the required math courses but I know there is a supplementary component so I’m not sure what to do.
also a friend told me that there are courses all management students take first year, so if I must transfer the second year, are there any prerequisites that I need to take during my first year? Do I take these courses and public policy courses since that’s my program for the time being?
thanks!

———————————————

hey,

first of all, kudos to you for knowing what you want to do!

friends jumping excited

most of us deny that we hate our subject POst until after we graduate yayyyyy *sobs in corner*

so it looks like you may be able to switch into your BBA program in second year if you take the appropriate first year management courses. it says here in the calendar:

“Students admitted to Arts & Science Co-op from secondary school will request a specific Co-op Subject POSt, or program, at the end of their first year, after achieving any necessary required courses for that particular area of study.”

if you take the courses required, you may be able to switch, however i would highly recommend (in fact, just do it) that you double check with the contacts i have provided below. since this is such a specific question, i feel like you would benefit a great deal from getting in touch with the program because you may need special permissions to switch.

 

deanna burrows- (one of the many artsci co-op people)

dburrows@utsc.utoronto.ca (416) 208- 2681

 

christine arsenault- (management co-op person)

arsenault@utsc.utoronto.ca (416) 287- 7112

 

you can find these numbers and more in the utsc telephone directoryand it’s almost always more effective if you call instead of emailing.

i wish i could tell you more but it is really up to the co-op directors to decide!

(sorry about the late response as well, we’ve been undergoing changes here at aska and some of our answers were deleted and had to be rewritten)

good luck at scarbs!

cheers,

aska

Jan21

human geography and humanities

I haven’t even received an admission offer yet and I already want to change my major. I applied for the Social Science program majoring in Human Geography. But now I think I want to major in something in the Humanities program. I understand that you don’t really have to declare your major in first year, and that would be a great if i still wanted to stay in the Social Sciences but if I want to change faculties, what do I do?

Thanks!

———————————————

So you want to change faculties do you?

I think you mean streams.

Fact: if you are accepted, you will be joining the super massive Faculty of Arts and Science which basically dominates all of the University of Toronto. Or well, not all of it, but a damn good chunk of it, that’s for sure. Like I’ve said many a time on this site, as long as you’re within the Faculty of Arts and Science, you can mix a whole range of programs of study — those in the humanities and social sciences included.

Cheers!

aska

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